Category: Film and Television

Quote of the Day: Julian Cope on being on Top Of The Pops

Sorting through a large file of newspaper clippings this afternoon, I came across this 2008 article from The Times on the subject of the legendary and late-lamented British music TV show, Top Of The Pops. The article quotes Julian Cope on the subject of his 1981 appearance on the show with Teardrop Explodes. If you know anything about Cope and his eccentric working methods, you’ll soon realise that this was no ordinary TOTP performance – in fact, he had dropped some acid beforehand, which probably wasn’t particularly sensible under the circumstances, since:

The piano started melting and I was wading up to my thighs in it by the chorus.

I dread to think how much mess that made….

Just say no to melting pianos, kids.

Quote of the Day: Peter O’Toole on how to party properly

As we’re now well and truly into the party season, here’s some very good advice on how to get the best out of your festive bash from the late actor and professional hellraiser Peter O’Toole. Does this perhaps describe your work Christmas party?

Fornication, madness, murder, drunkenness, shouting, shrieking, leaping polite conversation and the breaking of bones, such jollities constitute acceptable behaviour, but no acting allowed.

I’m sure O’Toole both hosted and attended many an epic party along such lines, although I’m not sure he’d remember much of it the the following day – after all, this was a man who once self-deprecatingly said:

I loved the drinking, and waking up in the morning to find I was in Mexico. It was part and parcel of being an idiot.

Idiot or not, he was a great actor in his time, and the worlds of theatre and film are lessened by his passing – they don’t make them like Peter O’Toole any more. Raise a festive toast in his memory at the next wild Christmas party you go to…

‘Grasp The Nettle’: The Trailer

Here’s something I’m really excited about. This is the trailer for Grasp The Nettle, the brand new film from some of the team behind the successful indie remix mash-up documentary The Crisis of Civilization (2011). Filmed during the immediate aftermath of the 2008 banking collapse and beyond, Grasp The Nettle follows the lives and experiences of an eclectic group of activists involved in two radical social projects in London – the Kew Bridge Eco-Village and the controversial Democracy Village in Parliament Square.

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‘The Crisis of Civilization’: Out now on DVD and online!!

After many requests from fans of the film and much hard work from the Crisis Team, it’s finally here… Yes, The Crisis of Civilization has, at long last, been unleashed online and on DVD!

You lucky people out there can now WATCH THE FILM FOR FREE ONLINE whenever you want. You can also DOWNLOAD THE FILM FOR FREE, and BUY THE DVD (which comes with lots of lovely extras) – all of which means that now you too can put a screening on in your community at any time and spread the word to your friends and family…

Remember, if you decide to buy the DVD, you can be safe in the knowledge that in doing so you are helping to support the project (which has been created on a shoestring by a small and dedicated group of people volunteering their time, skills and energy) in the important job of getting the film out to as many people as possible.

So tell your friends and share the links. Everyone should see this film!

Watch it. Download it. Buy it. Screen it. Share it.

‘The Crisis of Civilization’: Out on DVD and online 14th March!

Really exciting news reaches me from Crisis of Civilization HQ – from March 14th 2012 at 7pm UK time, everyone will be able to watch and download the film online for FREE, as well as being able to buy the DVD from the Crisis website or from Amazon!

The DVD will be available in both PAL and NTSC formats – which means that anyone can put a screening on now, wherever they are in the world – and comes in lovely eco-friendly recycled packaging (of course!) with over an hour’s worth of extra goodies for you to enjoy, including deleted scenes, remix films, and additional interview footage.

You’ll also find a range of subtitles in English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, German, Swedish and Chinese, which have been expertly put together by an amazingly dedicated bunch of linguistically talented volunteers.

There’s been lots of interest in the release already, with reviews from the Transition Voice website and the independent film magazine Little White Lies, as well as a great response from the BAFTA-winning film-maker, Nick Broomfield, who described The Crisis of Civilization as “a unique film. Everyone should see it”.

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Calling all Filmmakers! ‘The Crisis of Civilization’ Wants You…

I know my readers love a challenge – and here’s a really exciting one from The Crisis of Civilization team!

If you’re into film-making, you’re invited to take part in their Remix Film Challenge. Using audio, archive film footage and music, you too can make your very own Crisis-style sequence – and be in with a chance of winning an A1 poster and a DVD of The Crisis of Civilization (released in March 2012) in the process.

Detailed instructions on exactly how you can get involved, along with lots of links to download the audio files and to find archive footage – as well as other links to some useful editing software – can be found here.

You can also find out more about the archive film footage used in The Crisis of Civilization and watch some of the team’s favourite moments from the archives here.

Spread the word – tell your friends and start Remixing!

‘The Crisis of Civilization’: More FREE London Screenings and New Website!

You may have noticed that I’ve been a little quiet on the blogging front recently. The reason for that is a very exciting one – my friends at The Crisis of Civilization asked me to help them set up their brand new website, which went live (after a lot of hard work from the web team!) last week.

There’s already lots to read, watch and listen to on the new site. You can find out more about the crises featured in the film, discover how The Crisis of Civilization came to be made, watch some of the archive footage used in the film, read how artist Lucca Benney created the film’s distinctive animated sections, listen to radio interviews with the director Dean Puckett and the writer and narrator Nafeez Ahmed, or even learn how you can help by subtitling the film or by putting on a screening yourself!

And on the subject of screenings, I have some equally exciting news…

After last week’s successful London premiere at the Whirled Cinema, we have three more FREE London screenings of The Crisis of Civilization coming up in the next few weeks! Forget the consumerist excess of Christmas and come join the team for one, two or all of these:

15th December 2011 - Transition Brixton, 6-8 Robsart Street, SW9 0DJ – 7pm

16th December 2011 - UBS Bank of Ideas, 29 Sun Street, EC2M 2PT – 7.30pm

19th December 2011 - Tent City University at Occupy LSX, EC4M 8AD – 8pm

For more information on how to get to these venues, visit The Crisis of Civilization website here.

‘The Crisis of Civilisation’ needs your help!

What is ‘The Crisis of Civilisation’?:

The Crisis of Civilisation is a new and thought-provoking feature-length documentary film, which, in the words of the film-makers, investigates

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“She was, in short, too bloody much”: RIP Liz Taylor

Cropped screenshot of Richard Burton and Eliza...

Image via Wikipedia

It was those eyes. Those ridiculous, unfeasible violet eyes. That’s what made me, and millions of other movie-goers, sit up and take notice of Elizabeth Taylor over a film career that lasted more than six decades. A much, much better actress than her voluptuous, glamorous sexiness might, at first glance, suggest, she had an incredible screen presence, a huge acting talent, and the knack of making even the daftest films oddly watchable (Cleopatra, anyone?). Nominated for the ‘Best Actress’ Oscar five times, she won it twice – alongside many other acting awards – and performed with countless members of the Hollywood aristocracy over her long and eventful career.

There is no doubt her life was an intense one by most people’s standards and that she was one tough cookie – anyone who can survive child stardom in the Hollywood studio system of the 1940s, a grand total of eight marriages (two of which were to that notorious Welsh actor and professional hellraiser Richard Burton), well-publicised drug and alcohol addictions, and some very serious ill health would have to be, quite frankly. It was Burton who, half awestruck and half exasperated, described her as “too bloody much”; their tempestuous and profoundly passionate relationship (which began on the set of Cleopatra – see photo, above) made headlines around the world.

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