Quote of the Day: Peter O’Toole on how to party properly

As we’re now well and truly into the party season, here’s some very good advice on how to get the best out of your festive bash from the late actor and professional hellraiser Peter O’Toole. Does this perhaps describe your work Christmas party?

Fornication, madness, murder, drunkenness, shouting, shrieking, leaping polite conversation and the breaking of bones, such jollities constitute acceptable behaviour, but no acting allowed.

I’m sure O’Toole both hosted and attended many an epic party along such lines, although I’m not sure he’d remember much of it the the following day – after all, this was a man who once self-deprecatingly said:

I loved the drinking, and waking up in the morning to find I was in Mexico. It was part and parcel of being an idiot.

Idiot or not, he was a great actor in his time, and the worlds of theatre and film are lessened by his passing – they don’t make them like Peter O’Toole any more. Raise a festive toast in his memory at the next wild Christmas party you go to…

Christmas Corner

Over the years I’ve written a ton of posts on a festive theme, which have all proved to be very popular with you lot – in fact, it’s become a bit of a seasonal tradition round these parts (indeed, one of my long-time readers reckons I should actually write a book on the subject! I might. One day). There’s so many of these Christmas posts now that I figured it was about time I put them all in one place for easy access. So if you’re feeling Christmassy and fancy a good read, click on any of the links below to find out more…

(I’ll also be adding links to any future Christmas posts as they’re published, so watch out for those too…)

Mile High Lost Property

I’ve written before about the weird things that people leave behind in places like the Tube network and in hotels (as well as the bizarre items people pinch from said hotels!), so naturally I couldn’t resist when I came across this list of strange things found on planes by cabin crew from around the world. I wonder if any of these items were ever reclaimed by their owners?

Live parrot

Live falcon

Live tortoise

Glass eye

Prosthetic leg

A bag of sand

A clog

Box of dried fish

One shoe

Wedding dress

Bag of diamonds

Wig

Bag of onions

Toupee

Handcuffs

Double bass

One egg (without packaging)

Frog

Underwear

Written marriage proposal

I’m aware how exhausting air travel can be, and I’m pretty sure that some of these items of lost property are probably explained by excitable passengers attempting to join the Mile High Club, but one wonders just how forgetful you would have to be to to leave something like a double bass on a plane? Or a bag of diamonds. Or your wedding dress. Or even a live falcon – although I guess I should be grateful I’m not having to discuss snakes on a plane…

Quote of the Day: On how little things change…

I was in the library today. While flicking through the pages of a book on the 1832 Reform Act, I found this little story. You can imagine my reaction (and yes, I did get a dirty look from the librarian for laughing…):

[A] little girl asked her mother, ‘Mamma, are Tories born wicked, or do they grow wicked afterwards?’ To which the mother replied, ‘They are born wicked and grow worse.’

Whether this parental exchange really happened is immaterial – the story obviously struck a chord at the time. And, not far off two centuries later, absolutely nothing has changed…

RIP Nelson Mandela

No one is born hating another person because of the colour of his skin or his background or his religion. People learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.

Nelson Mandela 1918-2013

A remarkable, inspirational life well lived.

Rest In Peace.

November Update

I can’t quite believe it’s nearly December again; 2013 has gone by in a real flash (isn’t that – god forbid – actually a sign of getting old!?). I’d like to take this opportunity to thank you all for your continued support on Another Kind Of Mind this year, it really does mean a great deal – especially during the long periods of frustrating ill health which have made it difficult for me to post as regularly as I would have liked over the last twelve months.

All this has left me with quite a backlog of half written and long-promised posts, the drafts of which have taken to glaring accusingly at me from my Dashboard every time I log in to WordPress (inasmuch as the draft of a blog post can actually glare, of course…). Nonetheless, I really do need to get them properly finished off and posted before some of you die of boredom waiting for me to finally get them done!

However, there are some brand new posts in the works too – coming up over Christmas and the New Year will be plenty of the usual Another Kind Of Mind seasonal treats (as ever!), plus a good loud blast of my albums of the year for 2013 (warning: some of them really are quite noisy…), a few opinionated rants and, of course, any other divertingly interesting odds and ends that may turn up there or thereabouts in the meantime…

And over at the Top 50 albums blog, I’ve recently added a few more links to some great 1990s lists from various Twitter folk (if you still haven’t sent me your 90s list yet, please do get in touch here or on Twitter and I’ll add your Top 50 to the blog). I’ll also be sharing my 1970s Top 50 albums list with you over there in the New Year – I’ll post the full list here too, so watch out for that some time in January if you’re a music lover!

Also, if you’ve got any brilliant suggestions for new posts, I’d really love to hear from you – all ideas will be given due consideration, and you’ll be credited in any resulting posts. Get in touch too if you think you might like to write a guest post on Another Kind Of Mind sometime in the New Year. It’s easy. Simply leave a comment here or tweet me with your idea. Are you ready… set…. GO!

Oh, and for those festively-inclined folk who are already in a Christmassy frame of mind, you may be interested in some of my previous seasonal posts, which can be found here.

Stir-Up Sunday

Ah, the pudding. Months in the making. Finally...I’ve written previously about strange and interesting seasonal traditions, but here’s one I don’t think I’ve ever covered before….

A Twitter discussion last week about the wonder of proper British puddings (seriously, they really are the best in the world when done right) reminded me that today is Stir-Up Sunday. In this age of ready meals and 24 hour supermarkets, that may not mean much to you, but for many families it has long been the traditional start of the preparations for the Christmas season.

Stir-Up Sunday falls on the last Sunday before the start of Advent (as calculated by the Anglican church), and although it began life as a tradition loosely associated with religion and the impact of the church calendar on the everyday lives of ordinary people, it soon developed to have both religious and secular aspects – much as Christmas itself does in our modern world. Despite this tradition only really stretching back a couple of hundred years in its best-known form, the name ‘Stir-Up Sunday’ itself is derived from a prayer that dates back to the 16th century Book Of Common Prayer. Still said in a modern form every year on the last Sunday before Advent, the original version reads:

Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord, the wills of thy faithful people; that they, plenteously bringing forth the fruit of good works, may of thee be plenteously rewarded; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

That’s all very well, but what exactly does Stir-Up Sunday involve in reality? It’s the day on which households would traditionally gather to make the Christmas pudding for the year, having been reminded by the prayer said in church that morning – with each member of the family taking it in turns to ‘stir up’ the mixture and make a private, secret wish. In some traditions, there is a distinctly religious element to this, as it is believed that the pudding mixture must be made with twelve or thirteen ingredients (to represent Jesus and his disciples) and stirred from East to West (right to left, or anti-clockwise) to honour the Three Wise Men of the Nativity.

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Quote of the Day: On how to be a football fan, Victorian style

I don’t often write about sport, but I couldn’t let this one pass me by. I was rummaging in amongst my small library of football books today, searching for a particular quote (which is actually a whole other blog post in itself. Probably), when I found this little gem.* Apparently taken from the 1897 edition of the club handbook, here’s some useful – if perhaps slightly patronising – advice on how to be a proper 19th century Spurs fan:

Hints to Spectators

Learn the rules well before criticising.

Respect the rulings of the referee and refrain from unseemly demonstrations so common on many football fields when decisions are unpalatable – the best of referees make mistakes.

Applaud good football impartially.

Don’t let a defeat discourage you. It is at this time that encouragement is most wanted by players.

Don’t express your disapproval of a player so that everyone can hear, it only upsets him and he loses confidence.

This season’s team will doubtless accomplish some fine performances. Don’t, in your enthusiasm, forget that there is such a thing as mistaken kindness where athletes in training are concerned.

Don’t stop at home when the team goes away; they want your support more than ever when on opponents’ grounds.

Let visitors go away with the impression that the Tottenham crowd are good sportsmen.

Whether at home or away don’t forget the ‘Tottenham whisper’.

It’s amazing how little some things change over the course of a century – quite a few of these ‘hints’ are still clearly recognisable as issues within the game as a whole, and rightly so in some cases! However, despite being a life-long Spurs fan, I have absolutely no idea what the ‘Tottenham whisper’ is. Can anyone enlighten me?

* Powley, Adam and Cloake, Martin – ‘The Spurs Miscellany’ (Vision Sports Publishing, London; 2007), p.116

‘Teenage dreams/So hard to beat’: #KeepingItPeel 2013

#KeepingItPeel - October 25th (image via http://keepingitpeel.wordpress.com/)Nine years ago, on 25th October 2004, one of music’s great spirits left us. The word ‘legend’ is bandied around a great deal, but John Peel really was a legend – indeed, if you are a serious music fan, I can guarantee that a large percentage of your collection wouldn’t actually exist without him. He is still held in such affection by so many music lovers simply because he was one of us. He just got lucky and ended up on the radio, sharing his passion for music with generations of fans who religiously tuned in to his late-night Radio 1 show to hear what wonderful strangeness he was playing this time (often at the wrong speed – gotta love that vinyl!)

And his influence continues to this day, which is why Peel fans everywhere celebrate #KeepingItPeel every 25th October by posting something Peel-related online to honour his memory and legacy. This year, I decided to keep it simple and post the video to his favourite song ever (in fact, the opening lines to this glorious slice of pop-punk are carved on his tombstone) – and a truly classic song it is too….

Review: Pearl Jam – ‘Lightning Bolt’ (2013)

Lots of people on Twitter last night were asking for my views on this album, so I thought I’d scribble a quick review for all interested parties…

I fell in love with Pearl Jam twenty-two years ago with the release of the now classic Ten album. I was a messed-up fifteen year old back then, and it was probably inevitable, I guess! Since then, they’ve released a series of good and occasionally brilliant albums and I have continued to be a fan – but none of their last few albums have really captured and held my interest. Until this one.

The excellent punky lead-off single ‘Mind Your Manners’ (video below) had already piqued my curiosity in a big way, making me more excited about a new Pearl Jam album than I had been since sometime in the 1990s. And they didn’t let me down – even on the strength of a few early listens, it’s already obvious that Lightning Bolt is easily one of the best albums they have released in years.

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