Playlisting: Andrew Weatherall

Andrew Weatherall at Headstart, Turnmills, London (2001)
Andrew Weatherall at Headstart, Turnmills, London (2001)

Just what is it that you want to do?

We wanna be free. We wanna be free to do what we wanna do.

And we wanna get loaded, and we wanna have a good time.

And that’s what we’re gonna do.

We’re gonna have a good time. We’re gonna have a party…

Peter Fonda, The Wild Angels (1966)

Andrew Weatherall certainly knew how to have a party. An early participant in the notorious British acid house scene who was known for his six-plus hour sets and his writing for the cult Boy’s Own fanzine, this prolific DJ, remixer and producer was behind so much of the music I danced myself silly to in the 1990s. More than simply an underground club DJ with a penchant for a good time, his work has rightly become hugely influential over the last couple of decades. You may not perhaps think you know any of his work, but – trust me – you do.

Continue reading “Playlisting: Andrew Weatherall”

Playlisting: Hail Santa!

Embed from Getty Images

Christmas is Metal.

No, really. It is. It is known.

You need to trust me on this. It’s true. Christmas goes all the way up to eleven and then some…

Continue reading “Playlisting: Hail Santa!”

#KeepingItPeel 2019: The Cure (1980)

Fifteen years ago today, the world of music lost a legend. Yep, it’s really fifteen years since John Peel died (surely not – where has the time gone?) and, as always, Another Kind Of Mind is still #KeepingItPeel with a choice Peel Session from the archives.

This year’s selection comes from Goth pioneers and perennial lipstick-botherers The Cure, with an excellently twitchy version of their live favourite ‘A Forest’ from their third Peel Session in 1980.

As always, I recommend turning the volume up loud and Keeping It Peel…

More #KeepingItPeel posts here

#KeepingItPeel on Twitter here

Recommended Reading: Books on Music (The Another Kind Of Mind 10th Birthday Edition)

pile of assorted title book lot selective focus photographt
Photo by Suzy Hazelwood on Pexels.com

A few years back, I asked for your suggestions for a library of brilliant books on the subject of music. You certainly didn’t disappoint!

Since this week marks the tenth (!) birthday of Another Kind Of Mind, I thought I might revisit a post from the past to celebrate – and the music booklist seemed to be a good choice for that, since my musical library has certainly expanded since it was first posted in 2014…

So, have you got any suggestions for a list of great music books? What did I and my Twitter followers miss on the previous lists (see below)? What are your favourites?

Get in touch here or tweet me!

My original list

Twitter/Wordpress crowdsourced list

Update

The Last Train to Clarksville has left the station: RIP Peter Tork

The Monkees - May 1967
The Monkees – May 1967

So many celebrity deaths in recent years, but this one has really hit me on a very personal level. On the surface, the Monkees might have been a manufactured band with a daft TV show, but their music had a very profound impact on me as a child.

When my sister and I were little, we were given our dad’s old record player when he got a new one. It was one of those old-fashioned boxy turntables with a built-in speaker, and one of the very first records we had to play on it was a Monkees greatest hits album.

We must have driven our parents mad with how much we played it – it ended up much loved and completely scratched to death (we weren’t very good at looking after our vinyl at such young ages!).

Indeed, listening to ‘A Little Bit Me A Little Bit You’ on YouTube this afternoon, my brain still anticipated the point in the song where our record always used to skip. The fact that my subconscious does that more than thirty years later says a lot about the impact that record had on me!

With that battered old slice of vinyl, Mickey, Mike, Peter and Davey instilled in this music mad little girl a love of pure melody, harmony and perfect pop that remains to this day, and for that I am profoundly grateful.

Peter Tork, you will be missed.

The End of an Era: RIP ‘Fast’ Eddie Clarke

Rock ‘n’ roll got a little less rock ‘n’ roll yesterday with the passing of the one remaining member of Mötorhead’s classic lineup, guitarist ‘Fast’ Eddie Clarke. Guitarist for the band’s first six albums, he was responsible for the killer riffs that defined the band’s sound – most famously the driving, ferocious riffing that is the foundation of the all-time, stone-cold classic ‘Ace of Spades’

There’s no point in trying to intellectualise a band like Mötorhead, and why bother? Their blast volume music crossed the punk/metal divide with ease, and the classic line-up of Lemmy, Phil ‘Philthy Animal’ Taylor and Fast Eddie created a rock ‘n’ roll legend the likes of which we will never see again.

So turn the volume up and enjoy their simultaneously silly and kick ass version of Johnny Kidd and the Pirates ‘Please Don’t Touch’, recorded with the queens of eighties metal, Girlschool (a collaboration amusingly titled Head Girl), and let us hope the three of them are creating a noisy racket in a rehearsal room somewhere in rock ‘n’ roll heaven right now…

RIP ‘Fast’ Eddie Clarke (1950-2018)

“To all who pass that they may see, Rock ‘N’ Roll was a part of me”

Nik Cohn

More Toppermost!

You may recall that I wrote an article on the cult American punk/alternative musician Bob Mould for the excellent Toppermost music site a couple of years ago. Now, it seems that my scribbles helped inspire my transatlantic friend Wayne Jessup to contribute too, with this fascinating article (and accompanying playlist) on the near-legendary Boston post-punk band Mission of Burma being published just this week.

It’s excellent stuff and well worth a read, especially if you’ve not encountered Mission of Burma’s music before (although 90s kids may remember that their ‘That’s When I Reach For My Revolver’ was covered by Moby on his 1996 Animal Rights album, and he certainly wasn’t the only one to cover the track. The original – and best – version is below). This is a band who may not be as well-known as perhaps they should be – but their influence has been quietly pervasive over the decades, inspiring a large proportion of the grunge and alternative rock bands who found fame in the 1990s. And you can’t really argue with that.

Time to jump in and find out more…

You can find more of Wayne’s writing at The Owl Mag and Burned All My Notebooks… What Good Are Notebooks – or follow him on Twitter here.

#KeepingItPeel 2017: Soundgarden (1989)

Today marks the thirteenth anniversary of the death of John Peel, so I’m Keeping It Peel with a choice session from his long-running Radio 1 show. Since we also tragically lost Soundgarden’s astonishing vocalist Chris Cornell earlier this year, I decided on this, recorded by the Seattle band in 1989 – just before the grunge scene exploded into the mainstream.

This session shows Soundgarden in a slightly different light to their usual downtuned metal-influenced rock, featuring as it does unexpected and rather fun versions of Sly & The Family Stone’s ‘Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Again)’ and John Lennon’s ‘Everybody’s Got Something To Hide (Except Me and My Monkey)’.*

As always with Soundgarden, I recommend you crank the volume up high – and while you do that, I’ll be off to play Badmotorfinger at the wrong speed in tribute to Peel and Cornell; two men who shaped my musical taste at a formative age.

Until next year, keep it Peel…

*If you fancy more unexpected and frankly odd cover versions, head over to Twitter and follow @UnlikelyCovers.

“It’s all part of my Autumn Almanac…”

Autumn has officially arrived, and with it comes another season of having this glorious slice of perfectly-formed pop genius permenantly stuck in my head. Deliciously British and very distinctly Kinkish, you can immediately hear how the influence of this song and this band are still an integral part of modern music. Open all the windows to the Autumn sunshine and crank the volume high….