Tagged: International Women’s Day

International Women’s Day 2012: Why not celebrate every day instead?

Today is International Women’s Day, which celebrates the lives and achievements of women around the world. So today – and every day – I am celebrating all the amazing, inspiring and wonderful women in my life. Women I know and love. Women who have an impact on my life every day of every week of every year.

I am celebrating my strong and determined mother.

I am celebrating my talented, witty and intelligent sister.

I am celebrating my younger female friends, who approach living with an awe-inspiring passion, joy and strength.

I am celebrating my older female friends, some of whom may be retired but who most certainly are not retiring in their zest for life.

I am celebrating all the female artists, writers, poets, film-makers, musicians and DJs I know – all of whom fill my life with art and music and inspiration.

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International Women’s Day 2011

Today is the 100th International Women’s Day. Last year, I wrote about why IWD is still of vital importance around the world – and very little has changed worldwide in the intervening twelve months. Despite the widely-held (and erroneous) belief that feminism is no longer necessary in our society, British women, too, are still waiting for full equality and safer lives:

“The fact that 700,000 people will experience domestic violence in the UK… that there are sex slaves imported daily to this country who live lives of abject terror, that equal pay is still not a reality nearly four decades after the act enshrining it was passed, that the conviction rate in rape cases still hovers around 6.5%, that only 12% of the UK’s boardroom seats (as compared to Norway’s 32%) are occupied by women, are just a small smattering of reasons why women’s rights should remain a priority even here in the UK” – Mariella Frostrup in The Observer

Shocking though those close to home facts are, there is also much to be positive about today. Many countries celebrate IWD as a national holiday, meaning that we can celebrate the remarkable contributions so many women have made to societies all round the world…

Oh, and by the way: it turns out that – rather unexpectedly – 007 himself, James Bond, is actually a feminist. No, seriously. Who’d’ve thunk it?!

Happy International Women’s Day!

A Remarkable True Story for Women’s History Month

March is both Women’s History Month and International Women’s Month, which includes the marking of International Women’s Day on March 8th. In particular, as a history graduate and a feminist the former appeals to me greatly, and I decided to dig out a blog post I wrote way back in May 2007 (on the subject of one of my historical heroines) in honour of the occasion. Almost three years on, it naturally needed a little dusting off, a little editing and a few slight re-writes in places (and it’s also a little long) – but I hope you are as fascinated by the story of Noor Inayat Khan as I am.

“Nothing, neither her nationality, nor the traditions of her family, none of these obliged her to take her position in the war. However she chose it. It is our fight that she chose, that she pursued with an admirable, an invincible courage” – Madame de Gaulle-Anthonioz at the memorial service for Noor Inayat Khan.

The memory of Noor Inayat Khan is, in the main, ignored in this country; unlike in France, where she is justly considered a heroine – ‘Madeleine dans la Resistance‘. But who was this girl with the pretty, exotic name, who is so revered by the French? And why should we care about her today?

We should care because this woman did something amazing, something most modern women (and men) would probably find almost impossible – considering our pampered 21st century lives.

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International Women’s Day 2010

Today is International Women’s Day; “a global day celebrating the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present and future.”

First celebrated in 1911, IWD is as necessary now as it was then. In the early 20th century, women in many countries worldwide lacked the right to vote, the right to an equal education, equal employment rights, and often very basic reproductive rights and bodily autonomy –  all of these are things we would now consider to be basic human and civic rights for anyone, although many of these rights are still under threat for women.

But despite the fact that many of these women the world over are still disadvantaged, discriminated against and experience gender-based/sexual violence, much has been achieved since the first IWD, and much is still being achieved by the women’s movement and by individual women alike.  And that is indeed something to celebrate, as are the many remarkable and inspirational women who have left (or who are leaving) their mark on the world.

However, there is still much that can be and needs to be achieved by and for self-identified women everywhere. Commenting on a Facebook post of mine on the subject of IWD earlier, a sympathetic male friend wryly observed: “Yeah, but tomorrow it’s international men’s day again for the rest of the year!”

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