Tagged: Lists

Albums of the Year 2015

After all those Christmas blog posts, it’s time for another seasonal tradition on Another Kind Of Mind – my albums of the year list. As usual, I’ve ignored all the end of year ‘best of’ lists in every newspaper and music publication: these are the albums that I’ve personally loved most or found particularly interesting in 2015 (and yes, it’s been a good year for metal!). They’re listed alphabetically, since we’d all be waiting here until next Christmas if I tried to put them in any sort of order…

  • Deafheaven – New Bermuda
  • Death Cab For Cutie – Kintsugi
  • Faith No More – Sol Invictus
  • FFS – FFS
  • Four Tet – Morning/Evening
  • Iron Maiden – Book of Souls
  • Kylesa – Exhausting Fire
  • Leftfield – Alternative Light Source
  • Lianne La Havas – Blood
  • Little Boots – Working Girl
  • Napalm Death – Apex Predator-Easy Meat
  • Paradise Lost – The Plague Within
  • PiL – What The World Needs Now…
  • Run The Jewels – Meow The Jewels
  • Slayer – Repentless
  • Sleater-Kinney – No Cities To Love
  • The Charlatans – Modern Nature
  • The Chemical Brothers – Born In The Echoes
  • The Selecter – Subculture
  • Teeth of the Sea – Highly Deadly Black Tarantula
  • Therapy? – Disquiet

I did, however, manage to put my Top 5 songs of the year in some kind of order for the Festive 50, and you can find them here.

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The Festive 50 Top Five Songs 2015

Update 14/12/15: VOTING IS NOW CLOSED! Watch out for a link to the Top 50 soon…

Update 18/12/15: Sadly, none of my choices made the final list, but you can check out the full Festive 50 for 2015 here!

You know me, I love my lists! Over on Twitter, @TheFestive50 is busy compiling a chart of this year’s favourite songs (voting on Twitter closes next weekend, and the 2015 Top 50 will be available on the Festive 50 Mixcloud soon – you can find the final lists for the last two years at that link too). Obviously, this was a challenge I couldn’t resist. In reverse order, here are my top five choices….

5) Therapy? – Helpless Still Lost (from the album ‘Disquiet’):

As a long-time fan who always welcomes a new album by this kick-ass Northern Irish punk/metal trio, it was inevitable that I would include one of Therapy?’s excellent 2015 tracks in my top five – but it was really difficult to decide which one, since Disquiet (incredibly, their fourteenth studio album – I feel old) has pretty much been glued to my stereo on repeat since it came out earlier this year. With a sound and production which echoes their earlier material but that still feels fresh, this sludgy, riff-heavy clatter of a track was my eventual choice. This is a real return to form, and, like all of Therapy?’s best moments, this track manages to weave a bleakly twisted melody into the distinctively tangled raw-edged mesh of driving guitars and breakneck drumming that the band have utilised to great effect over the course of their career. More please!

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Recommended Viewing: Documentaries on Music – Your Choices

I knew you wouldn’t let me down! Just as it was with the music books, I’ve been sent so many suggestions of must-watch music documentaries that I’ve had to compile a separate list. And there’s some fantastic stuff here – almost every musical genre you can think of is represented on your list; pretty much something for everyone, whatever your tastes run to.

Again, we’d be here all night if I were to list everyone who contributed to the list (there were a lot of you…). You all know who you are – a big thank you to everybody involved, on and offline! If, after perusing these selections, you still think there’s something missing, have a look at my original list of documentaries first. If it’s not there, then please feel free to leave a comment or tweet me, and I’ll add it to this list.

As before, the list is arranged in alphabetical order by title, followed by the director’s name (if known – I have been unable to track down the director details for some of the BBC productions), the year of the film’s release, and any other necessary information. Some of these are straight-up documentaries, others are tour or concert-type films with a documentary aspect. One or two have a fictional and/or comedy element – this list does indeed go up to eleven… Most (but not all) of these films are available on DVD or can be downloaded/streamed online, and quite a few of them are also on YouTube.

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Recommended Viewing: Documentaries on Music

I’ve recently been watching Beware of Mr Baker, Jay Bulger’s fascinating warts-and-all documentary about the legendary drummer Ginger Baker, and it got me thinking again about an idea I had when we last updated the music books lists* – how about a similar list of recommended music documentaries? Contemplating the music films I’ve seen over the years and rummaging through my own DVD collection, I found more than enough to start a decent list of the films I’d recommend, which you’ll find below. However, I bet you’ve got loads of other suggestions for me and I’d love to hear them! You know what to do – tweet me or comment here, and we’ll see if we can compile the ultimate music documentary list…

The list is arranged in alphabetical order by title, followed by the director’s name and the year of the film’s release. Some of these are straight-up documentaries, others are tour or concert-type films with a documentary element. I’ve included one radio documentary, but I suspect there are plenty more of those too. Most of these films are available on DVD, and quite a few of them are also on YouTube. If you want any more information on any of the films on the list or why I chose them, just ask!

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Recommended Reading: Books on Music UPDATED

Last year, I posted a list of recommended books about music. The initial list was made up of my selections, but when I asked for any books I may have missed, the wonderful people on Twitter sent me so many new titles that I had to compile a second list!

I have recently updated both lists with even more recommended texts, and you can check them both out here:

Recommended Reading: Books on Music (my personal list)

Recommended Reading: Books on Music – Your Choices (the Twitter crowdsourced list)

If you have any more books that you’d like to see on the crowdsourced list, please do get in touch here on on Twitter.

Enjoy!

Recommended Reading: Books on Music – Your Choices

Well. I wasn’t expecting this when I asked you to suggest any books on music I might have missed! When I compiled my original list, I thought I might get maybe half a dozen folk recommending their favourite music texts, if I were lucky – instead, I was sent suggestions by nearly forty different people. Indeed, at one stage last night, the tweets were coming in so fast that I couldn’t keep up with them all and make a note of all the book titles you were sending my way at the same time! My apologies if I didn’t reply then – but I did see and note down all of them, and all of them are here (apart from one or two that I couldn’t find any info for).

And there are some great books here. Some I had actually read and shamefully forgotten about (Joe Boyd’s White Bicycles and Legs McNeil’s Please Kill Me for a start), some classics which I really should have read but haven’t (such as Ian Hunter’s Diary of A Rock ‘n’ Roll Star), and some I’ve never heard of but will definitely be tracking down as soon as I can (like Mark E. Smith’s autobiography, which sounds terrifying!). But they’ve all been recommended by people whose taste and opinions I respect – and therefore I happily recommend them to everyone else…

Finally, I’d like to thank everyone whose contributions made this list possible. I’d thank all 37 of you individually, but we’d be here all night and this post would be even longer than it already is. You know who you are.

This list has, like the original, been divided into three sections for ease of perusal. Biography, Autobiography and Memoirs contains exactly that – books written by or about a band, artist or music industry insider. Scenes, Eras and Places lists volumes covering specific times, locations and musical movements that have had an important impact in some way. Finally, Collected Writings covers more general texts, and compilations of music journalism and other writings. Each section is listed in alphabetical order by the author’s surname and the date given is that of first publication where known, unless otherwise stated.

23/05/15: Having just updated my personal list of music books, I asked if anyone had any more suggestions for this crowdsourced list…. and Twitter, you did it again! Thank you SO much to all of you who have contributed to the makings of this amazing list – you’ll find all your new additions in bold type below. Any glaring omissions may well be found on my original list (see link above); if not then please do get in touch here or on Twitter.

Also, many thanks to @damiella, who pointed me in the direction of this excellent post on the subject of music books over at Quirk Books, and to @maffrj, who sent me a copy of Mark E. Smith’s autobiography last time round!

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Recommended Reading: Books on Music

I’m often asked what books I would recommend to someone wanting to delve deeper into the history of the various popular music scenes of the past fifty years or so. That’s an interesting question, as there are so many fascinating volumes out there (and a fair few blatant cash-ins too, which really aren’t worth the paper they’re printed on). Rummaging through my own now-sizeable collection of music books inspired me to put together this list  – that and being a total listoholic, as regular readers will know!

When it comes down to it, I’m not necessarily saying these are the ‘best’ books on music ever because that’s such a subjective definition – I’ve chosen these books because I have read and enjoyed them all, and because I think they would be of interest to those music fans wanting to learn more about the music they know and the music they don’t. Most of them will be easy enough to find – your local library or bookshop should stock many of these titles – but you may have to track down one or two online. They’re worth the effort though…

The list has been divided into three sections for ease of perusal. Biography, Autobiography and Memoirs contains exactly that – books written by or about a band, artist or music industry insider. Scenes, Eras and Places lists volumes covering specific times, locations and musical movements that have had an important impact in some way. Finally, Collected Writings covers more general texts, and compilations of music journalism and other writings. Each section is listed in alphabetical order by the author’s surname and the date given is that of first publication, where known.

22/05/15: Having since read yet more books on music, I decided to update my list with some new additions, which are in bold type. If you’d like to contribute to the really quite brilliant crowdsourced list of music books which resulted from this original list, please do get in touch here, or tweet me. Thanks!

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Top 50 Best Ever Debut Albums: The Full List

Regular readers will know of my involvement in compiling Top 50 music lists – indeed, I’ve posted my complete 1970s and 1990s albums lists here in the past. For more information on the Top 50 Albums Lists project and more details of my Debut Albums choices, visit the Top 50s blog. You can also find a wide selection of other Top 50s from various different music fans over on the List of Lists.

50) The Charlatans – Some Friendly (1990)

49) The Verve – A Storm In Heaven (1993)

48) Chemical Brothers – Exit Planet Dust (1995)

47) Super Furry Animals – Fuzzy Logic (1996)

46) Elliott Smith – Roman Candle (1994)

45) Gram Parsons – GP (1973)

44) Daft Punk – Homework (1997)

43) The Postal Service – Give Up (2003)

42) Sex Pistols – Never Mind The Bollocks, Here’s The Sex Pistols (1977)

41) Carter The Unstoppable Sex Machine – 101 Damnations (1990)

40) The Prodigy – Experience (1992)

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Top 50 1970s Albums: The Full List

Last year, after much deliberation, I posted a list of my favourite fifty albums from the 1990s. Since then, I’ve compiled a 1970s list, which you can find in full below. For more information on the Top 50 Albums Lists project, visit the blog here – and you can find lots more 70s Top 50s on the List of Lists here.

50) The Police – Reggatta de Blanc (1979)

49) Madness – One Step Beyond (1979)

48) The Damned – Damned Damned Damned (1977)

47) Marianne Faithfull – Broken English (1979)

46) Lou Reed – Transformer (1972)

45) Various Artists – Nuggets: Original Artyfacts from the First Psychedelic Era 1965-1968 (1972)

44) Gram Parsons – GP (1973)

43) Sly & The Family Stone – There’s A Riot Goin’ On (1971)

42) Iggy & The Stooges – Raw Power (1973)

41) John Martyn – Solid Air (1973)

40) Kraftwerk – Trans-Europe Express (1977)

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Albums of the Year 2013

Since 2013 has finally drawn to a close (and since so many people asked me to), I’ve compiled the now-traditional end-of-year list of my favourite albums. As far as I’m concerned, 2013 has been a very interesting year for music. I’ve certainly been listening to more new albums over the last twelve months than I have done for a very long time – particular thanks must go to the #twitterindiecrew for all their excellent suggestions and recommendations (you know who you are!) – although this has also been a year for (re)discovering many old favourites too, which is perhaps reflected in the choice of artists and albums below…

10) MARK LANEGAN – IMITATIONS:

I confess that I find it pretty difficult to resist almost anything Lanegan does; I could listen that wonderful, world-weary voice of his sing the phone book and still love it. One of the joys of his voice is the sheer range of styles he can sing – everything from the blistering rock roar of his work with Screaming Trees to his delicate take on some of the well-known standards and more obscure tracks that appear here. Highlights include a lovely version of Nick Cave’s ‘Brompton Oratory’ (and I am not a Nick Cave fan), an astonishing reworking of the Bond theme ‘You Only Live Twice’, a gorgeous, heartbreaking take on Neil Sedaka’s ‘Solitaire’ and, to my delight, a deliciously melancholy version of Brecht and Weill’s classic ‘Mack The Knife’. This album is a fascinating treat for the music lover.

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